Flourish of Trumpets!

Trumpet creeper cropTrumpet creeper (Campsis radicans), a hardy native vine that sports beautiful trumpet-shaped orange-to-red flowers, is blooming on roadsides and anywhere it can get enough sun these days. And the hummingbirds are all over it! For hummers, as with us, red is a bright color. And the nectar at the base of the flower’s deep throat is just the ticket to keep those tiny birds coming!

Trumpet creeper is in the begonia family, one that has tropical roots. A woody perennial, the vine can grow to several inches in thickness. The writer of the Wikipedia article about this plant obviously is not a fan:

“The vigor of the trumpet vine should not be underestimated. In warm weather, it puts out huge numbers of tendrils that grab onto every available surface, and eventually expand into heavy woody stems several centimeters in diameter. It grows well on arbors, fences, telephone poles, and trees, although it may dismember them in the process. Ruthless pruning is recommended. Outside of its native range this species has the potential to be highly invasive, even as far north as New England.”

No matter! It’s part of our native flora, produces drop dead gorgeous flowers, and the hummingbirds and large nectaring insects love it. ‘Nuff said!

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4 comments

  1. Thanks again, Mary. I have long wondered what this beautiful vine is. Now I know!

  2. “ruthless pruning”? That seems a bit harsh for lovely trumpet vine!

  3. Pingback: Red Trumpet Vine is Hummingbird’s favorite | Hudson Valley Gardens

  4. Pingback: Vine Covered Trees | Forest Garden

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