seal of approval

Armchair Botanizing

It’s hot out there! The forest hums along: the drone of a thousand insect pollinators  and the drum of the sunlight bode well for the plants. The beat of short afternoon rainstorms, always promising more water than they deliver, complete the shimmering symphony. But us humans? Unequipped to take

seal of approval

Armchair Botanizing

It’s hot out there! The forest hums along: the drone of a thousand insect pollinators  and the drum of the sunlight bode well for the plants. The beat of short afternoon rainstorms, always promising more water than they deliver, complete the shimmering symphony. But us humans? Unequipped to take

IMG_3261

DYC Season is Coming On

Late summer is the season of the “DYCs” — yellow-flowered members of the aster family that are easily recognized as members of that aster (composite) family, but sometimes difficult to tell apart from each other. I found three blooming in

IMG_3261

DYC Season is Coming On

Late summer is the season of the “DYCs” — yellow-flowered members of the aster family that are easily recognized as members of that aster (composite) family, but sometimes difficult to tell apart from each other. I found three blooming in

IMG_3265

Butterfly in the Meadow

Well, sort of! I spotted this lovely Butterfly Pea, Clitoria mariana, blooming in the airport approach path  where the trees are cut periodically to keep vegetation low. And right beside it is another member of the pea family, Goat’s Rue,

IMG_3265

Butterfly in the Meadow

Well, sort of! I spotted this lovely Butterfly Pea, Clitoria mariana, blooming in the airport approach path  where the trees are cut periodically to keep vegetation low. And right beside it is another member of the pea family, Goat’s Rue,

IMG_3268

Speed well, Miss Callie!

Callie Oldfield, our Postbaccalaureate Fellow, has departed for the University of Georgia to pursue graduate studies. Callie’s participation — and in many cases leadership — has been key to everything the herbarium has accomplished in the past year and a

IMG_3268

Speed well, Miss Callie!

Callie Oldfield, our Postbaccalaureate Fellow, has departed for the University of Georgia to pursue graduate studies. Callie’s participation — and in many cases leadership — has been key to everything the herbarium has accomplished in the past year and a

IMG_0733

Watercolor Workshop Saturday, July 16

Join watercolorist Jack Baggenstoss for a day of plein air painting. Meet at the Sewanee Herbarium at 9 AM, after which participants will disperse across the central campus to paint in locales of their choosing. There are many options, both

IMG_0733

Watercolor Workshop Saturday, July 16

Join watercolorist Jack Baggenstoss for a day of plein air painting. Meet at the Sewanee Herbarium at 9 AM, after which participants will disperse across the central campus to paint in locales of their choosing. There are many options, both

IMG_3629

Introducing a Plant Conservation Alliance to Tennessee

Sewanee alumna Ashley Block (C’13), a PhD student at the University of Georgia in Integrative Conservation and Anthropology, has been working tirelessly over the past several months to help launch a program that will assist in protecting threatened and endangered

IMG_3629

Introducing a Plant Conservation Alliance to Tennessee

Sewanee alumna Ashley Block (C’13), a PhD student at the University of Georgia in Integrative Conservation and Anthropology, has been working tirelessly over the past several months to help launch a program that will assist in protecting threatened and endangered

20160628_132502

Who is eating our field gear?

As field scientists, we often need to leave out permanent plot markers – flags, metal and plastic posts, metal tags for trees. We worry that humans may disturb these markers, but more often than not, animals are the ones to

20160628_132502

Who is eating our field gear?

As field scientists, we often need to leave out permanent plot markers – flags, metal and plastic posts, metal tags for trees. We worry that humans may disturb these markers, but more often than not, animals are the ones to